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Irish Vocabulary, Everyday English and Slang

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A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

A

Afters (n): dessert
Ages (n): long time
Agro (n): fight
Alans or Alan Wickers (n): nickers; as in keep your alans on; calm down.
Alco (n): someone who's always drunk
Amadin (Omadhan) (n): idiot
Any Use? (n) any good? as in "Was the film any use?"
Apache (n): joyrider
Ape (n): fool
Arse (n): backside
Arseways (a): "I did it all arseways" = I made a complete mess of it!
Arthurs (n): a pint of Guinness; as in Arthur Guinness the founder.
That's Arthur Guiness talking (phr): when someone is talking rubbish while under the influence
Arthur Scargill (n): gargle/drink; after the miners union leader in the 80s in England.
Article (n): a woman, usually half in jest
Artist, government (n): person 'drawing' the dole [social security]Aubergine (n): brinjal, egg plant
Aul Man or Fella (n): father
Aul Wan (n): mother
Away with ye / away on / Aye right (phr): I don't really believe you.

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B

Babby (n): little child - baby
Baby Power (n): miniature bottle of Powers Irish Whiskey (favoured size for ladies handbags)
Bad dose (n): tough old time with illness
Bad egg (n): a dodgy bloke or a troublemaker
Bag of Taytos (n): packet of cold potato chips a.k.a. crisps
Bags (n): messy job
Bake (n): face/mouth
Baldy (phr): as in "I haven't got a baldy" I haven't a clue
Balls (n): to mess up, e.g. I made a balls of that job
Baluba (n): "stop acting like a Baluba". Horseplay, rough housing. Derived from the Baluba tribe Belgian Congo. Several Irish soldiers were killed by them in the early 1960s
Banger (n): old car
Bang on (a): perfectly correct
Banjaxed (a): broken, no good
Bap (n): bread bun
Barm brack (n): cake eaten at holloween, from gaelic bareen brack = a feckled cake
Barrelling (v): rushing around (with purpose?)
Baths (n): public swimming pool
Battle cruiser (n): the pub; rhymes with boozer.
Bazzer (n): haircut
Beamer (n): to be embarrassed - See Redner
Bean-jacks (n): ladies toilet
Bejappers (exclam): as above
Bells (n): time, e.g. 10 Bells (10 o'clock)
Be L.O. (n): keep a look out
Belt (v): hit, assault
Be wide (phr): be careful
Be dog wide (phr): be extra vigilant
Beor (pronounced bee-yo) (n): attractive woman
Berco (a): as in mad, or absolutely rotten drunk
Bevvies (n): alcoholic drinks
Beyant (n): beyond or over there
Bibe (n): a girl/woman and means she's a right old cow - from the Waterford area
Bills (n): pounds
Bird (n): girl generally, or girlfriend
Biro (n): ballpoint pen
Black (a): very crowded, busy - as in 'town was black!'
Blackers (n): blackberries
Blackguard (pron. blaggard) (n): a ne'er-do-well/ (v) to give someone a hard time: He's blaggardin' ya
Black Mariah (n): police van - Paddy wagon in the States
Black Stuff, the (n): Guinness
Blarney (n): nonsense
Blather (v): talk
Bleedin' deadly (a): brilliant
Bloody (a): strengthing adjective, used liberally
Blue shirt type of guy (n): after a 1930's quasi-fascist group
Bob (n): a shilling in the old Pounds, shillings and pennies; even though the monetary system changed, the name stuck
Bobble (v): to walk or to move somewhere
Bog (n): country area - where culchies come from
Bog ball (n): a derogatory name for gaelic football
Bogey (n): snot; something wrong, as in he's bogey or I got a bogey pint. Bogger/Bog warrior An Individual hailing from outside Dublin, but within Ireland
Bogs (n): public toilets
Bogtrotter (n): another word for a culchie
Bold (a): naughty
Bollix (n): alt spelling of below
Bollocks (n): anyone you think is stupid
Bolloxed (a): very drunk
Bolloxed up (v): screwed up
Bolt (v): go fast/ run away
Bombardier (n): type of Irish bus
Boozer (n): pub
Boreen (n): narrow lane or road
Boss (n): polite generic term when you're chatting to someone
'Bout ye (phr): how are you doing? (Originated in Belfast)
Bouzzie, Bowsie (n): young good-for-nothing, who hangs around on street corners
Bowler (rhymes with Cow-ler) (n): dog/ugly person
Boxin' the fox (phr): robbing an orchard
Boyo (n): a bit of a lad
Brilliant (a): great, best
Brutal (a): terrible
Bucketing (v): raining very heavily
Buckled (v): drunk
Bucko (n): lad, player
Bud (n): polite generic term when you're chatting to someone
Buff (n): another word for red-necks, although mostly used by red-necks to describe other red-necks living further out in the countryside, and likely to live on a farm up a mountain somewhere OR (a) naked
Bushed (v): exhausted/knackered
Business (n): cool - as in, 'It's the business' when asked about a new film, for example.
Buzzies (n): travellers

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C

Cacks (n): trousers - 'I was laughing me cacks off'- I was laughing so hard my trousers fell down
Caffler (n): idiot
Canary, nearly had a (n): had a fright
Canted (v): kicked a football over a wall - as in you CANT get the ball back - the other side of the wall contains usually a big dog who never gives you your football back
Capper (n): a handicapped person
Carry-on (n): argument, commotion
Cassie (n): back yard
Cat (a): no good, awful, very bad
Cess, bad (n): Bad luck
Cha (n): tea
Chancer (n): dodgy/risky character
Cheek (n): Disrespect
Chinwag (n): a chat
Chipper (n): fish and chip shop
Chips (n): french fries
Chiseller (n): young child
Chucker-out (n): doorman/bouncer
Circling over Shannon (phr): drunk. Derived from the visit of Boris Yeltsin to Shannon when he was apparantly too drunk to get off the plane. They circled six times to sober him up!
Claim (v): if you claim somebody you are picking a fight.
Clatter (n): slap
Clique (n): a group
Close (n): humid, as in "it's very close"
Cnawvshawling (v): complaining
Cod (v): having someone on, as in: "Aw, g'wan, yer only coddin' me"
Cog (v): copy someone else's work at school
Colcannon (v): Mashed potatoes, cabbage or kale & butter, served at halloween
Complan (n): meal supplement, usually drunk by pregnant women and grannies
Confo (n): Confirmation (Catholic sacrament)
Conkers (n): chestnuts
Cop on (to yourself) (v): get a life/don't be so stupid
Coppertop/ coppernob (n): Gingerhaired person
Cop shop (n): Garda station
Cooker (n): stove
Corner boy (n): somebody who hangs around aimlessly on the streets(gen a youth); used by older people
Covers (n): bedclothes
Cow Juice (n): milk
Cracker (a): wonderful
Craic (n): (pronounced crack) fun time and good conversation
Crisps (n): potato chips (cold)
Cub (n): young boy
Culchie (n): a city dweller's name for a country person
Cuttie (n): young girl
Cutty Knife (n): knife for cutting the bread

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D

Da (n): father
Dander (n): a leisurely stroll
Danny boy (n): twenty pounds in money
Deadly (a): very cool
Deadner, give a (n): to knee someone in the side of their thigh
Dear (adj): expensive
Dekko (v): look at, inspect
Delph (n): crockery, cups, saucers etc
Dense (n): stupid
Desperate (adj): terrible
Diabolical (a): really terrible
Dig (n): punch or slap
Divil (n): devil
DNS (n): the Northside (of Dublin) generally or one of its residentsDo a Bunk/Flit (v): sneak off, usually to avoid paying a bill, the rent, etc.
Dodgy (n): suspect/mechanically suspect
Doing a line (phr): courting, seeing someone
Doing (or speaking) 90 to the dozen (v): going (or speaking) very fast
Doing the rat race (v): driving through housing estates to avoid the traffic
Donkey's Years (n): a long time - 'I haven't seen him in donkey's years'
Doorstep (n): a sandwich made with thickly cut bread i.e. a mug of rosie and a doorstep
Dope (n): idiot, more playful than eejit
On the Doss (v): To be goofing off
Dosser (n): layabout, useless
Dote (n): a lovely little thing, usually a baby or a nice person
Down the Swanie (phr): down the drain
Dressed to the nines (phr): done up, in your Sunday best
Drink Link (n): a bank ATM
Dry up (phr): Shut up!
Duds (n): clothes

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E

Eat the head off (v): attack verbally
Eatin' house (n): restaurant
Eccer (n): homework (from exercises)
Eejit (n): idiot
Effin' and blindin' (n): cursing and swearing
Elephants (n): drunk

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F

Fag (n): cigarette
Fair play/whack to ya! : well done!
Falling from me, it's (phr): polite way of saying "I've got the runs"
Far wack, the (n): over on the opposite side.
Fecky the Ninth (n): complete idiot
Fib (n): a lie
Fierce (a): very; 'twas fierce cold
Fifty (n): stood-up (I got a fifty)
Fire away (v): continue, go ahead
Fiver (n): 5 pound note
Fla/Flah (n): very attractive person
Flahulach (a): flamboyant, also very generous, throwing money around
Flagon (n): large 2-litre bottle, usually cider
Flaming (a): drunk
Flea Rake (n): a comb
Flicks (n): movies, pictures
Flitters (a): tattered and torn
Flog (v): sell
Flummoxed (a): puzzled
Fluthered (a): drunk
Fly Cemetery (n): currant bun
Follier-upper (n): a serial at the pictures (movies). To be continued ...
Foostering (n): wasting time
Foundered (a): freezing cold
Fry (n): fried breakfast (typically sausage, bacon, eggs and pudding)

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G

Gaa, playing (v): gaelic football [from Gaelic Athletics Association]
Gack (n): refers to a foolish or stupid person. Can also be pronounced "gackawacka", or "gacky" (a). "Wise up ya gack ye." "Those shoes are gacky looking."
Gaff (n): house
Gallery (n): great fun, someone is a gallery-entertaining person- a mad laugh
Galya (n): baby
Gameball (exclam): OK
Gammy (a): useless
Gander (n): a nosey look
Ganky (n): ugly, unpleasant woman (Co. Cork)
Gansey (n): sweater, jersey, pullover
Gargle (n & v): alcohol - to go out drinking
Gas (a): funny
Gasur (n): young boy
Gatch (n): an unusual way of walking e.g. look at the gatch on him
Gawk (v): stare
Gear (a/n): good, clothes Gersha (n): young girl
Get on like a house on fire (n): to get on real well with someone
Gift (n): excellent, unexpected surprise
Gimp (n): an undeveloped weedy adult male
Gingernut (n): redheaded person
Git (n): rotten person
Give Out (v): to criticize someone - 'She gave out to him something fierce over standing her up'
Gizmo (n): a thing or most often a guitar
a Go (n): turn/fight
Go on outta that (phr): no way or you're pulling my leg
Gob (n): mouth
Gobsmacked (a): very surprised
Go-car (n): baby's pushchair
Gom, Gombeen (n): idiot
Good Gear (n): good, clothes or stuff
Gossoon (n): child
Gouger, (Gow for short) - (As used by Dublin Gardai) (n): a dangerous knacker/thief
Go way outta that! (phr): Dismissive response, indicating general disdain and disbelief
Grand (a): fine, nice
Gushie (n): to throw up a sweet/candy or coin and have a crowd of kids run to catch it.
Guard (n): policeman - also Razzers, the Razz, mule, pigs, shades, a female guard is a "banner" - (the irish for police woman is Ban Garda).
Guff (n): nonsense or smell
Gullier (n): a large marble used when playing along the road kerbGummin' (v): salivating, dying for something e.g. I'm gummin' for a pint.
Gur cake (n): a dense fruit cake
Gurrier / Guttie (n): lout, hooligan or gypsy
Gut (n): stomach
Gutties (n): trainers, sports shoes
Guzz-eye (n) cast in the eye i.e. "he has a guzz-eye"

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H

Hames (n): a mess - 'He made a right hames of the job'
Happy out (v): everything is sorted out now or you're generally happy with the situation.
Hard Neck (n): cheek
Hardchaw, Hardman (n): rough person, the type who's ready for a fight at the drop of a hat - "Yeah you, wha' ya lookin' a?"
Hard Tack (n): spirits (usually whiskey), neat
Hash (n): to mess up, e.g. I made a hash of it
Haven't got a baldy (phr): no chance
Haven't got a snowball's chance in hell (phr): no chance; longer version of above
Head (n): friend or pal e.g. How's it going head?
Header (n): nutcase, unstable person
Head the ball (n): foolish person/ or generic name for any person
Heavin' (v): thronged/packed i.e the place was heavin' lastSaturday Heel (n): the first or last slice of a loaf of bread
Heifer (n): an ugly country woman (the consensus being that she looks like a cow)
Hick or Hickey/Hickster (a/n): unfashionable
High babies (a): senior infants' school
Hockeyed them out of it (phr): really beat them in a game of football or whatever sport you are playing. Like 10-0
Hole in the wall (n): ATM
Holliers (n): holidays!
Holy joe (n): sanctimonious person
Holy show (n): spectacle
Hoofed (v): walked
Hooley (n): party or celebration
Hop, on the (n): bunk school, playing truant
Horrors (n): drunk, e.g. I was in the horrors last night
Hot Press (n): airing cupboard, where the hot water geyser is.
How are the men? (phr): said on entering a non-local pub (usually in the country) when there are a few of the locals present. It breaks the ice apparently.
How's the form? (phr): how are you?
How's the talent? (phr): Is there anyone good looking/ interesting about?
Howya: "how are you?" - typical greeting
Hump, the (n): sulking
Hunkers, on your (n): crouching down (squatting)

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I

I am in me wick (phr): you must be joking!
I could eat a baby's arse through the bars of a cot (phr): I'm hungry I could eat the lamb o' Jayjus through the rungs of a chair (phr): I'm very hungry
If I were mad, I would! (phr): I certainly won't
I've a mouth on me (phr): I'm hungry
I've a throat on me (phr): I'm thirsty
I will in me brown (phr): I won't!
I will in me ring (phr): certainly not!

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J

Jackeen (n): a culchie's name for a Dubliner
Jacked (a): tired
Jack in the box (n): A dead Dublin man
Jacks (n): toilet
Jaded (a): very tired, knackered
Jammer (n): stolen car
Jammers (a): very crowded, busy
Jammy client (n): class A fool
Jam on your egg (n): wishful thinking; will never happen
Jammy (a): lucky
Janey Mack! (exclam): Gosh, really?
Japers! (exclam): Gosh, really?
Jar (n): A pint
Jaysus (exclam): Jesus
Jibber (n): person afraid to try new things
Jo Maxi (n): taxi
Johnny-jump-up (n): pint of guinness mixed with Bulmers (cider)
Joyce (n): ten pounds in money
Juicy (a): cute

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K

Kimberley's (n): local biscuits, used to be made by Jacob's
Kip (n): a dump or a dive
Kip, to have a (n): short sleep, nap
Kisser (n) mouth
Knacker (n): a thug, always looking for a fight
Knackered (v): very tired
Knackerette (n): gypsy, traveling person of the female variety
Knacker's yard (n): The abattoir
Knickers (n): ladies' underwear also Don't get ur knickers in a twist (phr): don't worry yourself
Knick-knacking (v): ringing a doorbell and running away
Knicks (n) sports shorts

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L

Ladhb (n): awkward looking lad.
Lady Muck (n): a stuck-up woman
Lamped him out of it, I (phr): I really hit the guy hard, knocked him out
Langers (a): drunk
Lashing (v): raining hard
Lashings (n): a lot i.e. lashings of food
Laudy daw (n): refers to a posh person
Lay off! (exclam): leave me alone, stop it!
Legger, do a (phr): to abscond from the scene
Legging (it) (v): moving at pace!
Letting on (v): pretending
Life of Reilly (phr): carefree, hedonistic
Lift (n): elevator
Like a blue-arsed fly (phr): running around, hectically busy
Little green man (phr): a small bottle of Jameson's
Loaf (v): to head butt someone
Local, the (n): the nearest pub
Locked (a): very drunk
Lock in (n): when a pub locks people in after hours so the pub looks closed from the outside.
Longers (n): long trousers
Loopers (a): nuts - It was 'loopers'; that auld one is 'loopers'. She's 'looped out of it'
Lose the head (n): to lose control and start a fight
Low babies (a): junior infants' school
Lurching (v): slow dancing up close
Lush (n): a bit of a drinker

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M

Ma (n): mother
Maggot, Stop acting the ... (ph): stop messin' around
Mala (n): plasticine
Malarky (n): tomfoolery
Mangled (a): drunk
Manky (a): filthy dirty
Mantelpiece (n): ornamental area around a fireplace
Mary Hick, Mary Banger (n): unfashionable female
Massive (n): brilliant, deadly
Master (n): the best, expression of approval. "It's the master"
Me arse and Katty Barry! (phr): yeah sure!
Melted (a): very tired
Mentaller (a): crazy guy
Me ould segotia, me ould sweat, me ould flower (n): best friend
Messages (n): shopping, groceries
Messing (v): playing around
Midden (n): a sloppy person
Middling (a): so-so, neither good nor bad
Millie up! (phr): a fight going to start
Milling (v): fighting
Mind yer house! (phr): warning that one is going to be tackled from behind (sport)
Mind yourself (v): be careful
Minerals (n): soft drinks in the US, cool drinks in South Africa
Mink (n): traveller
Mitch (v): bunk school, playing truant
Molly (n): effeminate
Molly coddle (v): over protect
Mortaller (n): mortal sin
Mortified (a): embarassed, usually said by your ma
Mot (n): girlfriend
Motherless (a): drunk
Mouldy (n): lousy/rotten
Mountainy (a): as in "She's a bit mountainy"; term of abuse for women from the country denoting big and rough like a mountain.
Muck (n): soil
Mucker (n): either a culchie or sometimes, a friend i.e. someone you muck around with.
Muck Savage (n): mountain man culchie
Muck-truck (n): culchie school bus
Mulchie or Munchie (n): Somebody who lives in the country
Muppet (n): fool, idiot
Murder (n): tough going/difficult
Muzzy (n): a little brat

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N

Narky (a): cranky
Nawful (n): terrible
Nicker (n): money; 50 nicker=50 quid/pounds
Nickser, Nixer (n): a job done on the quiet so that no tax has to be paid on the wages.
Nifty (n): very useful
Nifty 50 (n): a Honda 50cc motorcycle
99, a (n): ice cream cone with a chocolate flake
Ninty to the dozen, going (v): going very fast
Nip (n): nude, as in 'I saw her in the nip'
Nits (n): head lice
Noggin (n): head
Norrier, the (n): The North Circular Road - [dublin]
Numbs (n): drunk, e.g. I was in the numbs last night
Nuts (a): mad

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O

Odds (n): loose change
Off licence (n): liquor store, place to buy take away booze
Off me face (phr): really high on drugs or alcohol
Off the drink (phr): means you're not drinking for a while. Typically lasts as long as the hangover!
Off your nut (v): crazy - 'That fella's off his nut'
Oinseach (n): an eejit; from old Irish meaning scabby old womanOirish (n): typically, clich'd Irish(ness)
Old Lady (n): mother
Old Man (n): father
Omadhaun (n): bit of a fool
On the ockie (phr): on the hop, playing truant from school, work
On the piss (phr): pub crawl, out drinking
One and One (n): fish and chips i.e. One and One Cod
Ossified (v): drunk
Oxters (n): armpits

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P

Packet of crips (n): a packet of potato crisps
Paralytic (a): very drunk
Pave (v): to rob something
Peeler (n): policeman
Pelt (n): skin
Pelting (v): throwing objects or pelting with rain
Perishing (a): ...are very cold
Petrified (a): drunk
Pictures (n): movies
Pint of plain (n): a pint of Guinness
Piped telly (n): Cable television
Piss in the Beds (n): dandelions
Pissed off (a): angry
Pisser (n): going out for a night of big drinking.
Pisshead (n): someone who's always drunk
Piss up (n): getting drunk. Let's all go on a big piss up
Plankin' it (phr): very nervous
Plastered (a): drunk
Plastic Paddy (n): someone of Irish descent who has all the accoutrements of Irishness - ends up being a cliche
Plonker (n): idiot
Pogue (n): kiss
Polluted (a): drunk
Poppies (n): potatoes
Porter, a rake of (n): a lot of stout
Posser (n): when you get a wet foot from walking in a puddle of water
Poteen (n): illegal spirits
Powerful (a): great, excellent, grand
Praities (n): potatoes
Pram (n): go-car, baby's pushchair, baby stroller/carriage
Press (n): cupboard
Provo (n): a member or supporter of the (Provisional) IRA
Puck (n): punch
Pulling me plum (v): doing absolutely nothing
Pull your socks up (phr): get to work/get busy
Put a gap in the bush (phr): close the door
Put the heart crossways in someone (phr): you'll give me a heart attack i.e. "Jasus, don't do that. You'll put the heart crossways in me"
Putting it on the long finger (phr): putting it off, procrastinating
Puss (n): face, usually sulky

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Q

Quare (n): contrary to popular belief this does not mean queer or strange but great! - it's irish irony
Quare hawk (n): odd fella
Quern (a): used only in wexford it means "very" i.e. "I'm quern tired."
Queue up (v): to queue, to line up
Qweer bit of skirt / talent (n): a really attractive woman / man.
Quid (n): pound(s); 50 quid=50 pounds

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R

Rabbit on (v): talk a lot
Rag order (n): disorganised
Rake (n): a great amount of anything Rapid (a): amazing
Rashers (n): pieces of bacon
Rat (n): squealer; some one who tells on you.
Re-calibration (n): any amount of time spent with the AA - (Alcoholic's Anonymous)
Reddener (n): blush
Redser (n): somebody with red or ginger hair
Reef (v): beat (a person) up
Ri-Ra (n): fun and excitement
Riverdance (n): The act of commiting suicide in the Shannon. "so and so did The Riverdance"
Ronnie (n): moustache - after movie star, Ronald Coleman
Root (v): search
Rosie Lee (n): tea
Rossie (n): brat
Rub-a-dub-dub (n): the pub
Rubber (n): pencil eraser
Rubbered as in "I was rubbered last night" (phr): my legs were made of rubber I had so much to drink
Rubber Dollies (n): running shoes
Ructions (n): Loud arguing or commotion - 'There were great ructions at our house last night'
Runners (n): trainers, everyday sports shoes
Rushers/wellies (n): wellington boots

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S

Sally (n): head; comes from Sallynoggin (Dublin suburb) you take out the noggin part which is head.
Sambos (n): sandwiches
Sap (n): wimp
Savage (a): very severe or excellent
Scab (n&v): one who scabs (constantly borrows or tries to get freebies); scabby, stingy
Scab (n): ugly woman/man
Scaldy (n): scabby, stingy
Scallion (n): spring onion
Scalped (v): to get a short haircut
Scanger (n): stupid female
Scarlet (a): blushing
Scatter (v): run away from something
Scram! : go away!
Scran (n): food
Scrap (n): fight
the Scratch (a): dole, social security
Scratcher (n): bed
Scrawbed (n): scratched by fingernails - usually in a fight
Screwed (v): fecked, in trouble
Scuttered (n): drunk
Scundered/scunderated (v): embarrassed
Scutting (v): catching a ride by hanging from the back of a moving truck and then jumping off
Session (n): Drinking all day long, typically starting before noon
Shades (n): police
Sham (n): used by a man from a rural area when addressing one from the city e.g. How's it goin', sham?
Shaper (n): young guy who takes up a lot of space when he struts around.
Shattered (a): exhausted
Shenanagans (n): carry-on/horse-play
Shift (n): kiss
Shiner (n): black eye
Shlossed (a): very drunk
Shook (a): looks very unwell e.g. "he looked shook"
Shore (n): outside ( your kitchen door) drain !
Shorts (n): liquor drinks (spirits) - shots or mixed drinks
Shower of savages (n): a crowd, out to have a raucous time but being a bit of a nuisance!
Shrapnel (n): loose change
Silko (n): similar to gouger except less offensive
Single (n): packet of chips (french fries)
Six o' one, half a dozen o' the other (phr): exactly the same
Skawly (a): horrible, not good
Sketch (n): usually a girl who looks a state
Skin (n): friend
Skinny (n): lowdown, gossip e.g. gis the skinny on me ol' mate
Skins (n): the papers used to roll a cigarette
Skiver (n): someone who avoids work
Slagging (v): having someone on, making fun of them
Slainte = Cheers (literally Health!)
Sleeveen, Slinkeen (n): a sly type, pinch the eyes out of your head
Slinjing (v): dragging your heels
Slug (n): mouthful of a drink - gis a slug
Snapper (n): child
Snaps (n): photographs
Snared rapid (v): caught doing something one shouldn't have been doing
Snitch, Squealer, Squaler (n): informant
Snobby Weather!! (phr): "are you choosing to ignore me?" (usually meant in humour)
Snug (n): pub booth
Soft auld day, it's a (phr): usually said by old people when referring to a typically Irish day, i.e. a soft rain falling
Soother (n): pacifier, dummy
Sound (a): really good
Specky Four-Eyes (a): anyone who wears glasses (kid's nickname)
Speedy (n): police motorbike
Sprog (n): kid
Spud (n): typical nickname for someone with the surname MurphySpuds (n): potatoes
Squealer (n): baby; someone who tells on you
Squizz (n): a look-see
Stabber (n): the last 1/4 of a cigarette - "leave us a stabber"
Stay easy (v): relax
Steamed, Steamboats (v): very drunk - "we're getting steamed (steamboats) tonight"
Steever (n): a kick in the backside
Stop the lights! : jayzuz, really?!
Stocious (a): drunk as a lord
Strand (n): beach
Strides (n): trousers
Streal (n): looking down and out
Stung (a): embarrassed after getting caught doing something ye shouldn't
Suckin' diesel (v): having a good time
Swimming trunks (n): mens' bathing suit

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T

Tackies (n): runners/trainers
Taig (n): catholic
Tan (n): an English person
Tenner (n): 10 pound note
That's Right (phr): to agree with someone
Thick (n)/(a): idiot/stupid
Thick as a ditch (phr): really stupid person
Thick as a brick (phr): stupid
Thick as a (short) plank (phr): stupid
Throwing Shapes (v): what a shaper does...see above.
Thunder & Lightning (n): knock like thunder, run like lightning: knocking at a door and running away. Also Knick-knacking
Tiddler: reference to small fish or child
Tinker (n): gypsy/travelling person
Tip (n): Garbage dump/dirty, messy place - 'That pub is an awful tip' Toe-rag (n): a useless bollix
Togs (n): swimming trunks
Toucher (n): someone who is always looking for a handout
Touched (n): a strange individual
Traipse (v): walk aimlessly
Trap (n): mouth
Trick-acting (v): horse-play, messing about, showing off
Turf Accountant (n): a.k.a. bookie / betting shop for horse or greyhound racing
Twisted (a): very drunk
Twistin' hay (v): means you're starting trouble, usually in a playful way
Two-bulb (n): squad car

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U

Up the yard!: be off with ya!
Up to ninety: (as in so 'n' so is ...) near boiling point, ready to explode

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V

Vexed (v): upset
Vixen (n): cute woman

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W

Wafer (n): ice cream sandwiched between two flat wafers
Wagon (n): ugly female
Wall-falling (a): knackered, exhausted
Want in him, there's a (phr): he's a bit slow
Warped (a): very drunk
Warped (a): strange
Weapon (n): it's great
West Brit (n): excessively anglophile
Wet the tea (v): make tea (comes from the practice of wetting the leaves in the bottom of the pot)
Whiff or Whack (n): a smell
Whist (v): keep quiet
Wick (a): crap
Wise Up, Kop On (phr): use your head, wake up!
Wojus (a): poor or bad; "That tea is wojus."
Wrecked (adj): tired

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X

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Y

Y-Fronts (n): Men's briefs
Yoke (n): a thing (pass me that yoke)
Yonks (n): a long time
Youngfella (n): generic term for a youth (male)
Youngwan (n): generic term for a youth (female)
You couldn't hit a cow's arse with a banjo (phr): bad aim, woeful hurler/darts player/soccer player etc.
Yoyo (n): euro

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Z

For those of you who wish to learn proper Irish grammar and vocabulary we recommend this very extensive website: http://www.daltai.com/grammar.htm